If there was ever a time to read all the books on your bookshelf that you've been ignoring for a while, this it it. I've been filling my days in isolation reading non-stop, lazing in the sun, and I wanted to make a list of my favourite books I've read for anyone who's trying to read more in this weird break from normal life. I am by no means a literary critic, these are just my own opinions on these books as someone who enjoys reading for fun!


Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
The reason there's not a photo of this book featured in this post is because I've read it so many times that it's beginning to fall apart and I desperately need a new copy. I could talk about this book forever, because it's so beautifully written, the narration is compelling and personal, and the story is fantastic. The prose is combined with the gothic setting, which I think it was makes this novel so magical. The story follows a young nameless woman, who becomes the wife of Mr Maxim De Winter and moves to Manderley with him, but something just doesn't seem right, and everything's a little strange. If you've never read this, do. You won't regret it.


The Pisces by Melissa Broder
This was initially a recommendation from my friend Kieran, who studies English Literature at uni, and I bought it and took it to Jamaica to last April to read whilst I was out there, with no idea about what to expect. This is unlike anything I've ever read, the story of connection between Lucy, a student/ librarian writing her dissertation on Sappho, and a mysterious swimmer she meets one night by the rocks. It's wild and passionate and bizarre and just such an interesting read. I definitely recommend it to anyone who's looking for something completely out of the ordinary to read! I'm gutted that I left this behind at uni when I packed up, but can't wait to re-read it when I get back!


Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens


I actually finished this book this week, and it was one of the most beautiful books I've read. The prose and imagery by the author was lovely, and the characters were at times heart warming, and at times heart breaking and frustrating. Honestly just a lovely yet heartbreaking book about human nature and our interaction with one another and the world around us, which is not what you'd expect from a book based around a murder. I loved every bit of this book, and it made me cry three times (which is really rare for me with books!).


The Lido by Libby Page
Again, a recommendation from my friend Kieran, this is one of the loveliest books I've read in a while. It's about Kate, a 26 year old writer who lives in London, who befriends 86 year old widow Rosemary whilst at their local swimming pool. When the lido faces closure, Kate and Rosemary start a campaign to save it, and develop an unlikely but heartwarming friendship. This novel is so sad and so happy all at the same time, and made me realise the importance of community and appreciating those around you.


Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
When Nick's wife Amy goes missing on their 5 year anniversary, all eyes turn to Nick and his oddly evasive behaviour. Written from the point of view of both characters, this book is amazingly written and leaves you feeling very uneasy and uncomfortable. I actually picked this up at an airport having never heard anything about it because I'd finished all the books I'd packed, and the cover looked nice (anyone else?). I loved it on the first read, and read it cover to cover on the flight back, and realised it was unlike anything I'd ever read before. I chose the book for my A Level English Literature coursework, studied intensely for a year, and still love it, which any English student will tell you, rarely happens. My opinions on the characters change every time I read it, and I'd recommend it to anyone for a completely different and shocking read. Plus, the film is really great, if films are more your thing.



The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The book isn't an easy read. In parts, it's quite frightening and unfortunately somewhat believable that a society like this could exist in a not-so-distant future. This book made me feel afraid and upset and happy and optimistic and heartbroken all at the same time. It's an important recognition about how frightening it can be to be a woman, and the scary possibility that it may never get much better. The narration is clever, and Offred is a likeable and relatable character, which makes the story easier to read, but the plot that ever-so-more terrifying.


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
I had to read this during my English GCSE, and found it difficult to read the first time around. I've since read it again, and absolutely loved it. It's such an important book, that focuses on the role of race, family and culture that I've not really experienced in any other book that I've read. It's extremely eye-opening to a to a time that I don't know as existing in this manner, because thankfully, it was long before I was born, but it's obviously so important to recognise that these times existed, and although racism is still a problem within society, we have come some way since the details mentioned in To Kill a Mockingbird. A sometimes difficult read, but I think it should be a compulsory read for everyone at least once in your life.


This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay
Unless you live under a rock, you've probably heard of this book. It's a collection of memos from Adam Kay from when he worked as a doctor on a maternity ward in the NHS. It's funny, and lovely and heartbreaking all at the same time, and gives you a real appreciation from NHS workers in a whole new light. The writing style is wonderful, and the humour is top notch as well. Honestly just a wonderful book to read.


The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald


I think out of this list, this is probably the most controversial, because a lot of people don't like this novel for the story or the writing. I first read this over the summer finishing year 11, and then I studied it in English Literature A level, and I read it maybe 3 times over those 2 years (hence the writing in the book - it's not something I normally do!). Reading at a slightly deeper level, this is obviously not the love story it's sometimes marketed as, it's more of a commentary on the layers of society and is quite a complicated novel in parts. I don't particularly like any of the characters in the book, which I normally struggle with, but I really like the book nonetheless, and I think a lot of that is down to Fitzgerald's writing style.

And that's it! Round up of books complete. There will definitely be some books I remember in the middle of the night and regret not putting on this list, but these are the firm favourites I concluded after several days of thinking. What are your favourite books? Have you read any on this list?

All my love (& happy reading!),

Em x
  • March 29, 2020

My All-Time Favourite Books - what to read whilst you're in self-isolation



If there was ever a time to read all the books on your bookshelf that you've been ignoring for a while, this it it. I've been filling my days in isolation reading non-stop, lazing in the sun, and I wanted to make a list of my favourite books I've read for anyone who's trying to read more in this weird break from normal life. I am by no means a literary critic, these are just my own opinions on these books as someone who enjoys reading for fun!


Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
The reason there's not a photo of this book featured in this post is because I've read it so many times that it's beginning to fall apart and I desperately need a new copy. I could talk about this book forever, because it's so beautifully written, the narration is compelling and personal, and the story is fantastic. The prose is combined with the gothic setting, which I think it was makes this novel so magical. The story follows a young nameless woman, who becomes the wife of Mr Maxim De Winter and moves to Manderley with him, but something just doesn't seem right, and everything's a little strange. If you've never read this, do. You won't regret it.


The Pisces by Melissa Broder
This was initially a recommendation from my friend Kieran, who studies English Literature at uni, and I bought it and took it to Jamaica to last April to read whilst I was out there, with no idea about what to expect. This is unlike anything I've ever read, the story of connection between Lucy, a student/ librarian writing her dissertation on Sappho, and a mysterious swimmer she meets one night by the rocks. It's wild and passionate and bizarre and just such an interesting read. I definitely recommend it to anyone who's looking for something completely out of the ordinary to read! I'm gutted that I left this behind at uni when I packed up, but can't wait to re-read it when I get back!


Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens


I actually finished this book this week, and it was one of the most beautiful books I've read. The prose and imagery by the author was lovely, and the characters were at times heart warming, and at times heart breaking and frustrating. Honestly just a lovely yet heartbreaking book about human nature and our interaction with one another and the world around us, which is not what you'd expect from a book based around a murder. I loved every bit of this book, and it made me cry three times (which is really rare for me with books!).


The Lido by Libby Page
Again, a recommendation from my friend Kieran, this is one of the loveliest books I've read in a while. It's about Kate, a 26 year old writer who lives in London, who befriends 86 year old widow Rosemary whilst at their local swimming pool. When the lido faces closure, Kate and Rosemary start a campaign to save it, and develop an unlikely but heartwarming friendship. This novel is so sad and so happy all at the same time, and made me realise the importance of community and appreciating those around you.


Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
When Nick's wife Amy goes missing on their 5 year anniversary, all eyes turn to Nick and his oddly evasive behaviour. Written from the point of view of both characters, this book is amazingly written and leaves you feeling very uneasy and uncomfortable. I actually picked this up at an airport having never heard anything about it because I'd finished all the books I'd packed, and the cover looked nice (anyone else?). I loved it on the first read, and read it cover to cover on the flight back, and realised it was unlike anything I'd ever read before. I chose the book for my A Level English Literature coursework, studied intensely for a year, and still love it, which any English student will tell you, rarely happens. My opinions on the characters change every time I read it, and I'd recommend it to anyone for a completely different and shocking read. Plus, the film is really great, if films are more your thing.



The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
The book isn't an easy read. In parts, it's quite frightening and unfortunately somewhat believable that a society like this could exist in a not-so-distant future. This book made me feel afraid and upset and happy and optimistic and heartbroken all at the same time. It's an important recognition about how frightening it can be to be a woman, and the scary possibility that it may never get much better. The narration is clever, and Offred is a likeable and relatable character, which makes the story easier to read, but the plot that ever-so-more terrifying.


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
I had to read this during my English GCSE, and found it difficult to read the first time around. I've since read it again, and absolutely loved it. It's such an important book, that focuses on the role of race, family and culture that I've not really experienced in any other book that I've read. It's extremely eye-opening to a to a time that I don't know as existing in this manner, because thankfully, it was long before I was born, but it's obviously so important to recognise that these times existed, and although racism is still a problem within society, we have come some way since the details mentioned in To Kill a Mockingbird. A sometimes difficult read, but I think it should be a compulsory read for everyone at least once in your life.


This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay
Unless you live under a rock, you've probably heard of this book. It's a collection of memos from Adam Kay from when he worked as a doctor on a maternity ward in the NHS. It's funny, and lovely and heartbreaking all at the same time, and gives you a real appreciation from NHS workers in a whole new light. The writing style is wonderful, and the humour is top notch as well. Honestly just a wonderful book to read.


The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald


I think out of this list, this is probably the most controversial, because a lot of people don't like this novel for the story or the writing. I first read this over the summer finishing year 11, and then I studied it in English Literature A level, and I read it maybe 3 times over those 2 years (hence the writing in the book - it's not something I normally do!). Reading at a slightly deeper level, this is obviously not the love story it's sometimes marketed as, it's more of a commentary on the layers of society and is quite a complicated novel in parts. I don't particularly like any of the characters in the book, which I normally struggle with, but I really like the book nonetheless, and I think a lot of that is down to Fitzgerald's writing style.

And that's it! Round up of books complete. There will definitely be some books I remember in the middle of the night and regret not putting on this list, but these are the firm favourites I concluded after several days of thinking. What are your favourite books? Have you read any on this list?

All my love (& happy reading!),

Em x

So, I turned 21 on Thursday, which to me, is an absolutely terrifying idea. I have friends older than me who will say that 21 is still so young, which in the grand scheme of things it is, but to me it feels like the first year of real adulthood. I found turning 20 made me feel very old last year, but turning 21 is different, it's full of responsibilities and decisions, and plus you have to go up to a new option on most questionnaires! In order to try and cheer myself up about the fact I'm getting old, I thought I'd talk about 21 things I've learnt from my 21 years on earth so far.

1. You will find your people.

I had a hard time in school when I was growing up, was badly bullied, and hadn't really had any 'real' friends at the age of 16. Sixth form was fine, I made some poorly judged friends, and some fantastic friends (massive shout out to Cam & Kieran if you're reading this). Unfortunately, having gone into full-time work straight after school, when all my friends went off to uni, meant I felt a little stranded in terms of friends & people to hang out with. Uni is where it all really changed for me! I was so so nervous that I wouldn't find really great best friends, and would be alone, but it was quite the opposite. Zara, Jas & Jade, I couldn't live without you, you keep me (relatively) sane, and I'm so thankful for all of you. I am also so thankful that last year, instagram bought me and my best friend Daisy together, and I'm so blessed and lucky to have her in my life.

2. Life is short: dye your hair, get that tattoo & eat that cake.

I personally believe in the philosophy that you shouldn't regret anything, because you wanted it at one moment in your life. Life is way too short to regret the things you didn't do.

3. Do what you want, and don't feel guilty about it!

Want to stay in and watch netflix instead of going out with your friends? Just do it; your friends will understand, and you'll feel better than you would have doing something you don't really want to.

4. Money won't bring you happiness.

Before I went to university, I was working as a trainee financial advisor for a private firm and had a good salary, but it wasn't enough. I'm happier now as a poor student because I love what I do everyday. The exact same thing happened to my boyfriend who worked in the same company as I did, and he's also now left to pursue something that he loves everyday. A well-paid salary won't make you smile as you come home, and want to tell your family all about your day, it only does that if you love what you do.

5. It doesn't matter whether you're a morning person.

I got so hung up in my first year of uni because I wasn't a morning person; you read so many articles saying that the most productive people are those who get up at 6 and go for a run and have done a billion things before their work day even starts, but it just wasn't me. I now get up between 9 and 10 most days, and fit my routine in around how I feel during the day. Having M.E. means that I generally don't cope very well with early morning starts, and so waking up a bit later works so much better for me - I'd rather have 6 productive hours of work than 10 unproductive hours because I can't stop yawning.

6. Worrying isn't worth it.

One of my favourite quotes is "worrying won't change the outcome", and I have it on my letterboard in my uni room all the time to remind me. It's so easy to worry about things like marks, or friendships or work or honestly anything, but all you're doing by worrying is using up time that could be used productively instead. It's so easy to say this, and I'm still not perfect at it, but I'm getting there.

7. You know your body best.

I specifically want to reiterate this in terms of chronic illnesses, but it applies to so many aspects of our life. I, like many other of my friends with chronic illnesses, had to push and push and push to even get a referral at a hospital, let alone a diagnosis. My battle with chronic illness and it's diagnosis has now been going on for over 7 years, and I'm only just getting close to a diagnosis, but I wouldn't have gotten anywhere without the confidence that I was able to tell that something was wrong in myself.

8. Hobbies are important.

Last year at uni, I didn't really have many hobbies, I just spent my time studying or sleeping. Sports aren't my thing, and I find social events quite tiring, and I just didn't feel like I fitted in any of the societies the university or my college offered. The wonderful thing about university is that you're free to do what you're want: my hobbies this year involve reading and painting, which I'm able to do from the comfort of my uni room and don't find them draining. I'm so glad I found hobbies that work for me this year as they give me a way to relax and de-stress at the end of the day, and help me sleep better too.


9. It's okay to cut toxic people out of your life.

I've definitely had to do this a couple of times, and it doesn't get any easier, but if someone (a boyfriend/ girlfriend/ family member/ friend) is having a negative effect on your mental health, then you need to prioritise yourself, and yourself only. 

10. Going to university is not your only option to get somewhere in life.

As mentioned above, I worked in finance for a year before I decided to apply to uni. When I was in sixth form, I felt extremely pressured to go to uni, especially as a student with good grades, and unfortunately my school left me feeling like I had very few options other than going to uni. Thankfully, at the time I was set on not going to uni, and I'm so glad I didn't! So, if you have a crappy career's adviser like I did, you don't have to go to uni to be successful - there are of plenty of other opportunities out there if you don't want to go! I have friends who in training schemes, full time work and apprenticeships, and the most important thing is to pick what's right for you.

11. Make effort with the people that make effort for you.

Life is too short for one sided friendships. It unfortunately happens, but recognising that it is a one-sided friendship or relationship is important. I'm not saying don't be there for someone who wouldn't do the same for you, because they may not have anyone else to talk to, but if you feel they wouldn't listen to you if you needed it, it may be time to backtrack a little from that friendship.

12. Be organised and prepared.

Being organised is one of the things that really helps me at uni and in my day to day life. You honestly never know what's going to happen, to always having your phone charged, emergency supplies of plasters and paracetamol and doing things and assignments in advance will all help you (hopefully) stay on top of things.

13. Your health is the most important thing.

I'm thankful that I learnt this pretty early on in life. It's hard to put into words, but essentially the message is that you don't owe anybody anything when your health is concerned. There's no reason for you to push yourself and make yourself more ill for an employer who would replace you in the blink of an eye. Don't sacrifice yourself for someone who wouldn't do the same for you.

14. You will be happy again.

I, like all of us, have feel heartbreak and sadness bad enough I didn't think I'd come back from it, but I did, and I'm fine now. We unfortunately all go through heartbreak of all different shapes and forms, and we all will experience great sadness. There is no perfect solution, a good support network helps, but there can be some small comfort in knowing that things will be okay in the end, and you will get back to being you.

15. Honesty is always the best policy.

Yes, a small lie may be the easiest and least scary thing to say at the time, but it will come back to bite you on the ass, they always do.

16. Memories are always worth the money.

I appreciate my memories of holidays and trips much more than that top I bought from H&M that time and probably wore twice before putting on depop. Memories are the things worth saving up for in my opinion, and its my memories and things I have to look forward to that keep me going sometimes.

17. Sometimes, being selfish is important.

I'm very much a people pleaser, and I like to try and do right by everyone all at once, which can be draining, mentally, emotionally and physically. Sometimes, it's okay to be selfish! On those days when you feel you need it, it's okay to shut yourself in your room with a book or a film, or to say no to somebody: your health is the most important, and having time for yourself plays such an important role in that.

18. I come from a background of privilege.

I am lucky that I come from a stable background, with enough money to get by. I know it hasn't always been easy for my parents, but I come from a background where my parents could afford food, and all of our bills for a nice house, and a holiday once a year. It took me a while to realise that whilst I am not rich, I am privileged to be able to afford the basics and also some luxuries in life. I think it's important to recognise said privilege, in the hope that I am able to use it to help others who are less fortunate.

19. Your parents are probably right (unfortunately).

Yes, it pains me to say this too. But google "20 things I learnt by 20" or "50 things I learnt by 50" and 99% of them will say this too. As you get older, you realise that your parents just wanted best for you when you were younger, and that you probably were a little shit as a teenager. They are unfortunately, very wise, and tend to know what's best for you as they've been there themselves.

20. Everything happens for a reason, and you will find your way.

I'm such a firm believer that what will be, will be, that I have it tattooed on my leg. The things I've been through, as cheesy as it sounds, have made me who I am today, and although there's times in my life so far that I don't particularly have fond memories of, it's taught me so many things and how to deal with things now.

21. Always tell the people in your life how much you appreciate and love them.

You never know when it'll be the last opportunity, make the most of them whilst they're around.



  • March 08, 2020

21 things i learnt before i turned 21


So, I turned 21 on Thursday, which to me, is an absolutely terrifying idea. I have friends older than me who will say that 21 is still so young, which in the grand scheme of things it is, but to me it feels like the first year of real adulthood. I found turning 20 made me feel very old last year, but turning 21 is different, it's full of responsibilities and decisions, and plus you have to go up to a new option on most questionnaires! In order to try and cheer myself up about the fact I'm getting old, I thought I'd talk about 21 things I've learnt from my 21 years on earth so far.

1. You will find your people.

I had a hard time in school when I was growing up, was badly bullied, and hadn't really had any 'real' friends at the age of 16. Sixth form was fine, I made some poorly judged friends, and some fantastic friends (massive shout out to Cam & Kieran if you're reading this). Unfortunately, having gone into full-time work straight after school, when all my friends went off to uni, meant I felt a little stranded in terms of friends & people to hang out with. Uni is where it all really changed for me! I was so so nervous that I wouldn't find really great best friends, and would be alone, but it was quite the opposite. Zara, Jas & Jade, I couldn't live without you, you keep me (relatively) sane, and I'm so thankful for all of you. I am also so thankful that last year, instagram bought me and my best friend Daisy together, and I'm so blessed and lucky to have her in my life.

2. Life is short: dye your hair, get that tattoo & eat that cake.

I personally believe in the philosophy that you shouldn't regret anything, because you wanted it at one moment in your life. Life is way too short to regret the things you didn't do.

3. Do what you want, and don't feel guilty about it!

Want to stay in and watch netflix instead of going out with your friends? Just do it; your friends will understand, and you'll feel better than you would have doing something you don't really want to.

4. Money won't bring you happiness.

Before I went to university, I was working as a trainee financial advisor for a private firm and had a good salary, but it wasn't enough. I'm happier now as a poor student because I love what I do everyday. The exact same thing happened to my boyfriend who worked in the same company as I did, and he's also now left to pursue something that he loves everyday. A well-paid salary won't make you smile as you come home, and want to tell your family all about your day, it only does that if you love what you do.

5. It doesn't matter whether you're a morning person.

I got so hung up in my first year of uni because I wasn't a morning person; you read so many articles saying that the most productive people are those who get up at 6 and go for a run and have done a billion things before their work day even starts, but it just wasn't me. I now get up between 9 and 10 most days, and fit my routine in around how I feel during the day. Having M.E. means that I generally don't cope very well with early morning starts, and so waking up a bit later works so much better for me - I'd rather have 6 productive hours of work than 10 unproductive hours because I can't stop yawning.

6. Worrying isn't worth it.

One of my favourite quotes is "worrying won't change the outcome", and I have it on my letterboard in my uni room all the time to remind me. It's so easy to worry about things like marks, or friendships or work or honestly anything, but all you're doing by worrying is using up time that could be used productively instead. It's so easy to say this, and I'm still not perfect at it, but I'm getting there.

7. You know your body best.

I specifically want to reiterate this in terms of chronic illnesses, but it applies to so many aspects of our life. I, like many other of my friends with chronic illnesses, had to push and push and push to even get a referral at a hospital, let alone a diagnosis. My battle with chronic illness and it's diagnosis has now been going on for over 7 years, and I'm only just getting close to a diagnosis, but I wouldn't have gotten anywhere without the confidence that I was able to tell that something was wrong in myself.

8. Hobbies are important.

Last year at uni, I didn't really have many hobbies, I just spent my time studying or sleeping. Sports aren't my thing, and I find social events quite tiring, and I just didn't feel like I fitted in any of the societies the university or my college offered. The wonderful thing about university is that you're free to do what you're want: my hobbies this year involve reading and painting, which I'm able to do from the comfort of my uni room and don't find them draining. I'm so glad I found hobbies that work for me this year as they give me a way to relax and de-stress at the end of the day, and help me sleep better too.


9. It's okay to cut toxic people out of your life.

I've definitely had to do this a couple of times, and it doesn't get any easier, but if someone (a boyfriend/ girlfriend/ family member/ friend) is having a negative effect on your mental health, then you need to prioritise yourself, and yourself only. 

10. Going to university is not your only option to get somewhere in life.

As mentioned above, I worked in finance for a year before I decided to apply to uni. When I was in sixth form, I felt extremely pressured to go to uni, especially as a student with good grades, and unfortunately my school left me feeling like I had very few options other than going to uni. Thankfully, at the time I was set on not going to uni, and I'm so glad I didn't! So, if you have a crappy career's adviser like I did, you don't have to go to uni to be successful - there are of plenty of other opportunities out there if you don't want to go! I have friends who in training schemes, full time work and apprenticeships, and the most important thing is to pick what's right for you.

11. Make effort with the people that make effort for you.

Life is too short for one sided friendships. It unfortunately happens, but recognising that it is a one-sided friendship or relationship is important. I'm not saying don't be there for someone who wouldn't do the same for you, because they may not have anyone else to talk to, but if you feel they wouldn't listen to you if you needed it, it may be time to backtrack a little from that friendship.

12. Be organised and prepared.

Being organised is one of the things that really helps me at uni and in my day to day life. You honestly never know what's going to happen, to always having your phone charged, emergency supplies of plasters and paracetamol and doing things and assignments in advance will all help you (hopefully) stay on top of things.

13. Your health is the most important thing.

I'm thankful that I learnt this pretty early on in life. It's hard to put into words, but essentially the message is that you don't owe anybody anything when your health is concerned. There's no reason for you to push yourself and make yourself more ill for an employer who would replace you in the blink of an eye. Don't sacrifice yourself for someone who wouldn't do the same for you.

14. You will be happy again.

I, like all of us, have feel heartbreak and sadness bad enough I didn't think I'd come back from it, but I did, and I'm fine now. We unfortunately all go through heartbreak of all different shapes and forms, and we all will experience great sadness. There is no perfect solution, a good support network helps, but there can be some small comfort in knowing that things will be okay in the end, and you will get back to being you.

15. Honesty is always the best policy.

Yes, a small lie may be the easiest and least scary thing to say at the time, but it will come back to bite you on the ass, they always do.

16. Memories are always worth the money.

I appreciate my memories of holidays and trips much more than that top I bought from H&M that time and probably wore twice before putting on depop. Memories are the things worth saving up for in my opinion, and its my memories and things I have to look forward to that keep me going sometimes.

17. Sometimes, being selfish is important.

I'm very much a people pleaser, and I like to try and do right by everyone all at once, which can be draining, mentally, emotionally and physically. Sometimes, it's okay to be selfish! On those days when you feel you need it, it's okay to shut yourself in your room with a book or a film, or to say no to somebody: your health is the most important, and having time for yourself plays such an important role in that.

18. I come from a background of privilege.

I am lucky that I come from a stable background, with enough money to get by. I know it hasn't always been easy for my parents, but I come from a background where my parents could afford food, and all of our bills for a nice house, and a holiday once a year. It took me a while to realise that whilst I am not rich, I am privileged to be able to afford the basics and also some luxuries in life. I think it's important to recognise said privilege, in the hope that I am able to use it to help others who are less fortunate.

19. Your parents are probably right (unfortunately).

Yes, it pains me to say this too. But google "20 things I learnt by 20" or "50 things I learnt by 50" and 99% of them will say this too. As you get older, you realise that your parents just wanted best for you when you were younger, and that you probably were a little shit as a teenager. They are unfortunately, very wise, and tend to know what's best for you as they've been there themselves.

20. Everything happens for a reason, and you will find your way.

I'm such a firm believer that what will be, will be, that I have it tattooed on my leg. The things I've been through, as cheesy as it sounds, have made me who I am today, and although there's times in my life so far that I don't particularly have fond memories of, it's taught me so many things and how to deal with things now.

21. Always tell the people in your life how much you appreciate and love them.

You never know when it'll be the last opportunity, make the most of them whilst they're around.



hello hello and welcome to my blog! I'm Emily, a twenty-something year old blogger based in Lincolnshire, and a psychology student at the University of Durham. I blog about almost everything, including student life, books, my favourite music & living with a chronic illness.

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